Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Wombles of Wombeyan.....



This photo is the Sepia Saturday prompt this week. We bloggers try to follow the theme, in some vague way, as a seed in our thoughts. Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images. Click here to learn more.



The Wombeyan Caves were first inhabited by..........

Wombles
During the late 18th and 19th centuries, large numbers of criminal Wombles were transported from Wimbledon Common to the various Australian penal colonies by the British government. One of the primary reasons for the British settlement of Australia was the establishment of a penal colony to alleviate pressure on their overburdened prison regime for these irritatingly tidy creatures. Over the 80 years more than 165,000 Wombles were transported to Australia. [Source: Wombedia]





All was well for many years with this population until.....




....one socialist thinking Womble got stroppy in 2013.

"Oi mate!.. (he wrote to the nice lady Australian Prime Minister)....."I need a new scarf"




And like every good Labour Prime Minister.......


She set about knitting one for him...........
(She has Wild Welsh Womble blood it is alleged, how could she refuse this mis-shapen request from a distant cousin?)


After all......

....she had a little wool left over from her own scarf.



But in politics such nepotism is dangerous...

Her best friend Kevin had only received a rather cheap polysester school tie  after being ousted as Prime Minister.

He got mighty mad......


and sulked ........

and sulked......


Until he eventually got his own way.......

Now everyone is unhappy in Australia....except of course... The Warm Wombles of Wombeyan Caves.



The End


Thursday, June 20, 2013

The Milk Inspector calls.....

This photo is the Sepia Saturday prompt this week. We bloggers try to follow the theme, in some vague way, as a seed in our thoughts. Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images. Click here to learn more.


This man is an Australian milk inspector......

He condemns milk and is the scourge of the farmer
(Note: The muslin shoulder bag contains a personal maturing cheese he made some months ago and is keeping warm in his armpit. More detail and full recipe at http://agapakis.com/cheese.html where you will discover that m
any of the stinkiest cheeses are hosts to species of bacteria closely related to the bacteria responsible for the characteristic smells of human armpits or feet.


...and milk inspectors abound the world over........



Canadian




British

 ( John Cheese, formerly with the Ministry of Agriculture)



Belgian



USA

(Dairy Queen quality control)



Kosher

Mixtures of milk and meat (Hebrewבשר בחלב‎, basar bechalav, literally "meat in milk") are prohibited according to Jewish law. This dietary law, basic to kashrut, is based on a verse in the Book of Exodus, which forbids "boiling a (kid) goat in its mother's milk" (Source Wikipedia)




USA, Maryland

(former unemployed magician, re-trained)



China

(after removing all nutritious melamine for use as an additive for baby food, the milk is poured on the farmland)



Egypt

(Makes a well balanced cheese)




The Ultimate Inspector....

The well-known advertising slogan for Whiskas was "eight out of ten owners said their cat prefers it". After a complaint to the Advertising Standards Authority, this had to be changed to "eight out of ten owners who expressed a preference said their cat prefers it". (Wikipedia)
(But I really think my dear Bessie is a snob...Whiskas is twice the price of supermarket own brand !)



The end

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Introducing: Miss. Ethel Sludge......Sepia Saturday 181


This photo is the Sepia Saturday prompt this week. We bloggers try to follow the theme, in some vague way, as a seed in our thoughts. Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images. Click here to learn more.




All about Miss. Ethel Sludge and family.

I have seen this daguerreotype before today.........This charming image of Ethel Sludge “Oil-Eyes-Ethel”, one of the most famous of the early Texan oil heiresses.


 Readers will surely know that she was the great-great Aunt of........ 


.....the delightful Pamela Ewing.
(Note: Pam is wearing her great-great aunt's earings)



I let my train of thought wander.....


...actually its a through train,
but its all Google could come up with.





It set me reminiscing...................


...do you remember the 80s when we watched TV in the evenings?


I wondered...............


....was J.R. a sweet natured man? No hang-ups?

After all.............


....he looked it sometimes.

Or was he..........


....really like Narcissus?
(What Narcissus Really Saw, after Caravannio)




With fear I recalled......

Debugger





.........a person who gave me a considerable email bashing a couple of weeks ago, and which through my own silly fault I compounded by bothering to reply. I had to wonder why she was so bothered to try to offend me, and then go on to lecture me as if she was a professional tutor and I was some poor little lad sent to her to improve my social skills. You know the type of person..."I'm a very busy person..."...implying that the rest of us are lazy thick old toads.





Me being defragmented.
But.....

....she did teach me one good lesson (actually I already knew it but am always tempted to forget):

DO NOT  reply to a rude or sarcastic email.

and although I did not advise her so, I will ask you now:

“Please don’t send emails to me when you have had a few drinks” (especially if it’s still 10am your time !)




Wondering if JR and my attacker shared a trait.....

.......I Googled “Self importance”  It seemed seemed a good idea. A sort of on-line health check. Was it me who had a problem, or the person who digitally hit me? Which of us had a chip on our shoulder? Why was I so megabitten by her? Why was she such a Tera-RAM?

I discovered the problem of self importance really exists as Narcissistic Personality Disorder, NPD.

I also have to say, honestly, that it made most interesting reading on Wikipedia. I was able to reflect on all and many spats I have had with people over time, face to face, or in correspondence, and wonder if I, he/she, or both of us were the sufferers. But I will be the judge of that, and I’m not going to share the judgment with you !


The more worrying thing....

.........is that researchers have suggested  that the incidence of NPD has more than doubled in the US in the prior 10 years, and that 1 in 16 of the population have experienced NPD. (One has to assume that such conclusions might  be applied to similar economies and western cultures, so this is not a dig at US Sepians!).

They have PH.D.s, they must be smart...



 It has been suggested that the cause of this may be social networking online......

.........if its true, we are all on the slippery path. Beware!



Thank you Oil-Eyes-Ethel.....for enabling my travel down this interesting route.







Ethel Sludge died in Devon, England, in 1945.
She never returned to Texas.


Ethel Sludge.....R.I.P.
(simulation image of her now hidden grave)




The End




P.S.

All my life I have wanted to know Ethel Sludge better. 

When I was a six year old (1956 say) we used to go and visit my great uncle and aunt who lived on Beesands, a quite remote village and beach in Devon. They lived in a nice house, Sunnydale, conveniently converted during WWII by the US Army into a concrete pill-box, and very much still containing many tons of concrete that Uncle Percy never did chip away by the time he died.


Beesands, early 1900s. Sunnydale, the house at the farthest end of the beach., by the quarry.
(Own collection..post card)

The beach was adjacent to, and operationally part of, the next beach Slapton Sands, which was in 1944 part of the site of the ill-fated Exercise Tiger. and Exercise Fabius. These were exercises practicing the forthcoming Normandy Landings by elements of the 1st Infantry Division and 29th Infantry Division (United States).



Torcross and Slapton Sands.
A postcard by J Salmon Ltd, circa 1920s, from an original water colour drawing by A.R.Quinton
(Own Collection)


Behind Beesands there was a sign by a patch of derelict farmland: "Ethyl Sludge is buried here" and as we passed I always asked my Dad who Ethel Sludge was. I suppose it amused my parents. Eventually I got the correct message, but to this day I always think of dear Ethel when I recall Devon.

Presumably it was a dumping ground created when the US military emptied their fuel supplies and sediments as they cleared the area after the war, ready to hand back to the evacuated population.



Thursday, June 6, 2013

The Kaiserina's Hospital Train...Sepia Saturday 180



This photo is the Sepia Saturday prompt this week. We bloggers try to follow the theme, in some vague way, as a seed in our thoughts. Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images. Click here to learn more.




Nice train Jenny !! 

The Kaiserina....
Auguste Victoria Friederike Luise Feodora Jenny von
Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg.
(Courtesy Wikipedia)


But vee Brits can do better !!


My nursing great aunt spots a British train !!...........


Yes... as an army nurse in Alexandria, Egypt, 
Mabel Smith photographs a camel train of the Camel Corps.
(Own Collection)

The Imperial Camel Corps Brigade (ICCB) was a camel-mounted infantry brigade, raised in December 1916, by the British Empire, for service in the Middle East, during the First World War. 
From a small beginning the brigade eventually comprised four battalions, one battalion each from Great Britain and New Zealand and two battalions from Australia. Support troops included a mountain artillery battery, a machine gun squadron, Royal Engineers, a field ambulance, and an administrative train.



And if the soldiers can ride them....so can the nurses!
(Own Collection)


And we send our injured boys home, or to Malta, by ship.....

....with good food.....and a stuck up pig.


The Dunluce Castle, at Alexandria Docks, by Nurse Mabel Smith.
(Own Collection)

Diary of John Evan Adlard 1915-1918 (Driver & Lieutenant)
 5th Reinforcements 1st Divisional Ammunition Column,1st Australian Field Artillery - 2nd, 3rd And 16th Batteries
Australian Imperial Expeditionary Force 
10/10/15 Parade 1000 for clothes and 1330 for departure in motor, a drive for some miles past everlasting stone walls and cuttings and small harbours, shops, houses and goats, thro' an arch allowing about 3 inches each side to spare to the main dockyard and then aboard a Hospital Ship. BOUND FOR ENGLAND. Note: routine 'S.S. Dunluce Castle': 0700 Breakfast - eggs, porridge, 0900 Doctor 1100 Medical Officer in charge Inspection (a stuck up pig this Major), 1200 Lunch - soup, meat, pudding, 1700 Tea - eggs, bread and butter, tea, 1900 Supper - cocoa, bread and butter 2030 in bed 2100 lights out.




Back in England vee do it by bus Jenny !! 


My grandmother Mary Barnes takes her patients for a bus trip.
 Compton, Ashbourne, outside Lloyds Bank.

(Own Collection)



Jenny...Your chef looks like he cooks a good hock on the train.....

........but here at Christmas we have plenty of turkey for our patients.


Christmas lunch.
Devonshire Hospital, Buxton, Derbyshire.
(Own Collection)


We loved it on the beach in Alexandria.......
(Own Collection)


....but our tents were a little rough !
(Own Collection)


Our patients get a fresh copy of the Times of Egypt each day.
(Own Collection)






And Jenny.....vot was your daughter's gift to the troops?.....
(Tin. Own Collection)

Decorative brass tin sent by Princess Mary to members of the British, Colonial and Indian Armed Forces for Christmas 1914. Over 426,000 of these tins were distributed to those serving on Christmas Day 1914. The tins were filled with various items including tobacco, confectionery, spices, pencils, a Christmas card and a picture of the princess. The idea was the initiative of Princess Mary, the 17-year-old daughter of King George V and Queen Mary.

Princess Mary, daughter of George V.
(Public domain)

Princess Victoria Louise of 
Prussia,  daughter of Kaiser 
Wilhelm II.
(Public domain)







My grandmother Mary Barnes with patients, Devonshire Hospital, Buxton, Derbyshire.
(Own Collection)



.....and again at the Red Cross Hospital, Ashbourne, Derbyshire.
(Own Collection)




Howard is recovering,
but he should put out the Black Cat.

(Own Collection)





Red Cross Hospital, Duffield, Derby.
(Own Collection) 






Nurse Mabel Smith (left), at the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary.(Own Collection) 





We are bowled over by all the good care !!
(Somewhere in/near Derby) (Own collection)
postcard format by Frederick J. Boyes of 22 & 24 Osmaston Road, Derby




Goodbye Jenny....take good care of your train, you will be needing it.

(The following text courtesy of Wikipedia):.......

On November 10 1918, Kaiser Wilhelm II--now Wilhelm Hohenzollern, private citizen, crossed the border by train and went into exile in the Netherlands, which had remained neutral throughout the war.

The Weimar Republic allowed Wilhelm to remove twenty-three railway wagons of furniture, twenty-seven containing packages of all sorts, one bearing a car and another a boat, from the New Palace at Potsdam.



Now you are just like us Willie !!....a taxi to the station.....

......wait for the train....late again......

.....off vee go !
(Train images courtesy of, and full story at   
http://communities.zeelandnet.nl/astro/pagina/77251 )


Upon the conclusion of the Treaty of Versailles in early 1919, Article 227 expressly provided for the prosecution of Wilhelm "for a supreme offence against international morality and the sanctity of treaties", but Queen Wilhelmina refused to extradite him, despite appeals from the Allies. King George V wrote that he looked on his cousin as "the greatest criminal in history", but opposed Prime Minister David Lloyd George's proposal to "hang the Kaiser". President Wilson rejected extradition, arguing that punishing Wilhelm for waging war would destabilize international order and lose the peace.

Wilhelm first settled in Amerongen, where on 28 November he issued a formal statement of abdication and released his soldiers and officials from their oath of loyalty to him, thus formally ending the Hohenzollerns' 400-year rule over Prussia. He subsequently purchased a country house in the municipality of Doorn, known as Huis Doorn. This was to be his home for the remainder of his life. He died there in in 1941.


The Kaiserina: In 1920, the shock of exile and abdication, combined with the breakdown of her son Joachim's marriage and his subsequent suicide, proved too much for the Kaiserina. She died in 1921, in Huis Doorn, Netherlands. The Weimar Republic allowed her remains to be transported back to Germany, where they still lie in the Temple of Antiquities, not far from the New Palace, Potsdam.



The End




P.S.

 Major Charles Sydney Smith M.C
The brother of Mabel Smith was Charlie Smith about whom I have written before. The following letter was written by him complaining about matters after his term in hospital at Machine Gun HQ, Belton House, Grantham, between April and September 1918.

Sadly he died of infuenza at the same hospital on November 28, 1918, just a few days after the war ended.



Belton Military Hospital. Machine Gun Corps. Complaint letter.
(Own collection)